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Hugo expands its sustainability initiative in new collection

By Rachel Douglass

Sep. 7, 2021

Fashion

Image: Hugo

As part of its autumn/winter 2021 collection, upmarket design house Hugo has introduced its Clean Up Your Act initiative aimed to involve customers in its sustainable mission.

Upcycled and repurposed pieces make up a large portion on offer, as well as a number of sustainable cotton basics to further the selection. The collection comprises of looks for both men and women, featuring dresses, hoodies, t-shirts, outerwear and accessories in the broad range of offerings.

Trainers are made up of yarn constructed from recycled bottles, while padded parkers and other activewear styles are crafted using recycled fabrics and responsibly sourced cotton blends.

Image: Hugo

Its partnership with Cotton Made in Africa is also set to extend, with new accessories included in the roundup. Hugo Boss began its cooperation with the foundation in 2019 releasing a number of sustainable collections since its partnership began, including Hugo x Liam Payne launched towards the end of 2020. The organisation aims to empower cotton farmers in Africa through trade agreements aiming to improve living and working conditions.

Products part of the Clean Up Your Act initiative must be made up of 60 percent sustainable, third-party verified materials. Items are labelled as Responsible, with dedicated clothing tags and a special area in the online store allowing for easy identification.

In addition to the launch, the brand is offering customers a Clean Up Your Act repair kit, complete with branded sewing patches that encourage buyers to repair their items instead of throwing them away.

Hugo has made a number of steps as part of its commitment to sustainable production and circular supply chains, with an emphasis on materiality-based objectives. Alongside its parent company Hugo Boss Group, the label has made a number of goals such as utilising 100 percent sustainably sourced cotton by 2025.

Image: Hugo